bookpatrol:

Dr. Seuss as a political cartoonist

Dr. Seuss is forever entrenched  in the upper pantheon of children’s books writers. Many of the 46 children’s books he wrote still have a place on our kids bookshelves. From Cat In The Hat to Hop on Pop to Green Eggs and Ham his stories are part of the fabric of many a childhood. His books have sold over 600 million copies, and appear in more than 20 languages. In 2000, Publishers Weekly compiled a list of the best-selling children’s books of all time; of the top 100 hardcover books, 16 were written by Dr. Seuss!

For two years, in the early 1940’s and early in his career Theodor Seuss Geisel aka Dr. Seuss was also the chief editorial cartoonist for the New York newspaper PM. During his tenure he drew over 400 politically charged cartoons.

The current happenings in Ferguson, Missouri lead me to his political cartoon pictured above, ”What this country needs is a good mental insecticide,” which led me to his archive housed at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

 About half of Geisel’s output was gathered by Richard H. Minear for his book  Dr. Seuss Goes to War in 1999, all 400 are cataloged and available online courtesy of UCSD special collections

The book:

Dr Seuss Goes To War by Richard H. Minear. Introduction by Art Spiegelman. Published by The New Press, 1999

Buy: Powell’s | Amazon

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.
After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.
Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.

After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.

Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

(via todaysdocument)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

February 25, 1870: America’s First Black Senator Is Sworn In
Hiram Rhodes Revels, the country’s first African American member of U.S. Congress, took his seat on this day in 1870, representing the state of Mississippi. Southern Democrats, who were for the most part supporters of segregation, tried to block his nomination.
From the U.S. House of Representatives Archives:

Just before the Senate agreed to admit a black man to its ranks on February 25, Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality…. The Declaration was only half established by Independence. The greatest duty remained behind. In assuring the equal rights of all we complete the work.”

Revel’s term lasted little more than a year. Hiram Rhodes Revels impressed many political observers with his oratorical gifts and moderate temperament.Dive deeper into the story behind Revel’s election with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

February 25, 1870: America’s First Black Senator Is Sworn In

Hiram Rhodes Revels, the country’s first African American member of U.S. Congress, took his seat on this day in 1870, representing the state of Mississippi. Southern Democrats, who were for the most part supporters of segregation, tried to block his nomination.

From the U.S. House of Representatives Archives:

Just before the Senate agreed to admit a black man to its ranks on February 25, Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality…. The Declaration was only half established by Independence. The greatest duty remained behind. In assuring the equal rights of all we complete the work.”

Revel’s term lasted little more than a year. Hiram Rhodes Revels impressed many political observers with his oratorical gifts and moderate temperament.

Dive deeper into the story behind Revel’s election with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

(via tballardbrown)