lifeasanerdprincess:

So here’s a picture of the LA library bookmobile for the sick  in 1928. That picture was featured in an article i just read on Distractify. It features a lot of other photos of the years 1920 to 1970 taken by photographers who are not all named (that’s a problem, so if anyone knows  who took that picture here, please tell me).
But anyway, these pictures are worth seeing. Here’s the link to the full article.

lifeasanerdprincess:

So here’s a picture of the LA library bookmobile for the sick  in 1928.

That picture was featured in an article i just read on Distractify. It features a lot of other photos of the years 1920 to 1970 taken by photographers who are not all named (that’s a problem, so if anyone knows  who took that picture here, please tell me).

But anyway, these pictures are worth seeing. Here’s the link to the full article.

(via creepingirrelevance)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.
After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.
Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.

After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.

Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

(via todaysdocument)

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.
When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  
This week*, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.
Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.
Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.
Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.


*”This week” refers to a week in April when the LBJ library was originally hosting this event. We reposted today to commemorate the date of the bill being signed.

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.

When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  

This week*, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.

Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.

Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.

Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.

*”This week” refers to a week in April when the LBJ library was originally hosting this event. We reposted today to commemorate the date of the bill being signed.

othmeralia:

This pamphlet, issued in 1918, provides a glimpse into some of the concerns of the United States War Department during the last year of World War I (or as it was known at the time, the Great War). The paint and varnish specifications outlined in the pamphlet applied to paint orders carried out by “manufacturers of army equipment,” and “orders…placed direct by the War Department” (p. 3).

A “General Specifications” section laid out the physical properties as well as the testing, inspection, labeling, and delivery standards to which paints had to adhere. Requirements for specific paints were to be found in the rest of the pamphlet - each entry consisting of a paint’s name and corresponding identification number. For some entries, a color card was also included.

For more WWI materials from our collections, check out Home Before the Leaves Fall.

atlantahistorycenter:

image

Civil War letter to Union soldier Gilmer Watts

In June 1864, Clara Watts takes a moment to write to her husband, Union soldier Gilmer Watts. Watts is patrolling a picket line near Kennesaw Mountain. He won’t get the chance to read her letter… 

Watch Episode 9

Georgia Public Broadcasting and the Atlanta History Center commemorate the 150th anniversary of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman’s 1864 march into Georgia with the original series, “37 Weeks: Sherman on the March.”

The First World War in Poetry and Literature

oupacademic:

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This year marks the centenary of the beginning of the First World War. Oxford University Press is sharing numerous resources for scholars and students looking for new understanding of the war and its legacy: poetry, literature, and culture would never be the same in its shadow.  

Read the full Oxford Journals Virtual Issue dedicated to the First World War Centenary.

Find further resources at the First World War Centenary Hub on our UK website, World War I: Commemorating the Centennial on our US website, the University of Oxford First World War activities, the World War I Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings resource center from the University of Oxford and JISC, Bodleian Libraries’ Oxford World War I Centenary Programme, and more to come throughout 2014. 

Image credit: William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939), Irish poet and dramatist, 1920. George Grantham Bain collection, Library of Congress

compoundchem:

This graphic looks at a selection of the chemicals used as either irritant or poisonous agents during World War 1, including chlorine, phosgene and mustard gas. You can read more about them, and see a larger version of the graphic, right here.

compoundchem:

This graphic looks at a selection of the chemicals used as either irritant or poisonous agents during World War 1, including chlorine, phosgene and mustard gas. You can read more about them, and see a larger version of the graphic, right here.

Spoiler alert: the last four words will break your heart…

peerintothepast:

One of the most beautiful libraries in the country was the Public Library of Cincinnati. It opened in 1874 and was demolished in 1955.

(via americanlibraryassoc)