engineeringhistory:

Michael Faraday’s induction ring, used in experiments that led to the discovery of electromagnetic induction on August 29th, 1831. Faraday wrapped two wires around opposite sides of an iron ring, inserting one into a galvanometer and the other into a battery. He observed “waves of electricity” resulting from the change in magnetic flux.

engineeringhistory:

Michael Faraday’s induction ring, used in experiments that led to the discovery of electromagnetic induction on August 29th, 1831. Faraday wrapped two wires around opposite sides of an iron ring, inserting one into a galvanometer and the other into a battery. He observed “waves of electricity” resulting from the change in magnetic flux.

workman:

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

(via vintagegal)

gov-info:

(via sayheyala)

ajcphotovault:

Take Piedmont Avenue into the past
1958 - Broadview Plaza Shopping Center
One of Atlanta’s major thoroughfares, Piedmont Avenue has changed along with the city. Downtown, Midtown and Buckhead, where it becomes Piedmont Road, are all part of the journey. Take a look at some photos of the street and its buildings through the years.

ajcphotovault:

Take Piedmont Avenue into the past

1958 - Broadview Plaza Shopping Center

One of Atlanta’s major thoroughfares, Piedmont Avenue has changed along with the city. Downtown, Midtown and Buckhead, where it becomes Piedmont Road, are all part of the journey. Take a look at some photos of the street and its buildings through the years.

vintagelibraries:

City directory, tattered from extensive use, on table at New York Public Library, 1944.

vintagelibraries:

City directory, tattered from extensive use, on table at New York Public Library, 1944.

lifeasanerdprincess:

So here’s a picture of the LA library bookmobile for the sick  in 1928. That picture was featured in an article i just read on Distractify. It features a lot of other photos of the years 1920 to 1970 taken by photographers who are not all named (that’s a problem, so if anyone knows  who took that picture here, please tell me).
But anyway, these pictures are worth seeing. Here’s the link to the full article.

lifeasanerdprincess:

So here’s a picture of the LA library bookmobile for the sick  in 1928.

That picture was featured in an article i just read on Distractify. It features a lot of other photos of the years 1920 to 1970 taken by photographers who are not all named (that’s a problem, so if anyone knows  who took that picture here, please tell me).

But anyway, these pictures are worth seeing. Here’s the link to the full article.

(via creepingirrelevance)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.
After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.
Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

congressarchives:

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Equal treatment of all Americans, regardless of race, was a major debate for decades in the U.S. Congress. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged Congress to take action. Passage of the act was not easy. We’ll be exploring some of the key moments for the Civil Rights Act throughout the day.

After the House passed the bill, it was sent to the Senate for consideration. The bill was placed directly on the Senate calendar instead of being sent to committee. Southern opponents of the bill led a filibuster, a time-delaying tactic used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly, for sixty days. This cloture motion, the only formal procedure that provides for breaking a filibuster, passed the Senate 71 to 29 on June 10, 1964.

Cloture Motion for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 6/10/1964, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 563505)

(via todaysdocument)

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.
When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  
This week*, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.
Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.
Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.
Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.


*”This week” refers to a week in April when the LBJ library was originally hosting this event. We reposted today to commemorate the date of the bill being signed.

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.

When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  

This week*, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.

Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.

Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.

Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.

*”This week” refers to a week in April when the LBJ library was originally hosting this event. We reposted today to commemorate the date of the bill being signed.